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Making Web Video At The Expert’s Studio in Portland, Oregon For A Facebook Fan Page

www.withnewmedia.com Paul Colligan joins the team to create the intro video for the With New Media project at the Expert’s Studio in Portland, Oregon. Video was taken on a $150 Kodak Zi8 camera. What you’ll see in this web video is the filming of a high definition introduction recording that Paul will be using on his “With New Media” Facebook Fan Page.

7 Facts New Media Creators Must Face If They Want To Survive This Year

It’s time to face facts. Here are 7:

Niche audience programs can’t survive on mass audience advertising models. This one has GOT TO STOP. The reason American Idol can do well on a few pennies per audience member is because they have a few zillion audience members to pull pennies from. Good for them, they can have them. But, the niche content creator who thinks there are a few zillion pennies in their niche to collect don’t understand the meaning of the word niche.

And the funny thing is, people want to pay more for niche than they want to pay for mainstream stuff. Why won’t we let them? The odds of making good money on pennies per audience member are so small … why do that to yourself when there are better options for everyone?

What are you afraid of?

The “Old Media” guard is doing what they can to block you out.
For me, the big theme at CES wasn’t 3D or eBook readers, or any of the other memes you’ll read about. For me at least, the big theme was that “Old Media” is spending insane amounts of money to get better at what they do.

The only reason any machine of that size “gets better” is because there is competition that might take market share away from them. The “Old Media” guard is aware of what might happen and are doing everything in their power to prevent it.

Real reason for 3DHDTV? Even Kodak won’t be able to produce a $200 camera that pulls that off.

Real reason for IPTV? Cable cutting has become so real, they’re getting ready for when it goes mainstream.

Real reason for embedded widgets in TV sets and Blu-ray players? It’s called futureproofing your tech.

But if you look at the demos, you’ll notice something very important, very important … NEW MEDIA AIN’T PART OF ANY OF IT. We haven’t been invited to that party and they so hope that we continue to bicker about page design changes at YouTube and the size of our checks so we won’t notice what’s going on.

And the thought process has even infected us. Why in the world will Boxee automatically add a new episode of “Two And A Half Men” to my queue but not an episode of Geekbrief or The Totally Rad Show?

If we don’t force ourselves into their playing field, we’re not going to be invited to the games.

Despite all this great tech, it’s still easier to watch TV than to watch you. Yes, “kids” watch stuff on their computers and love it. Yes, the average 17 year old sees no difference in watching on the laptop than on watching on the TV. These funfacts are merely transitionatory tidbits that will mark a few years of our history, not our future.

But, dear friends, the future is Internet on the television and the phone. The future is YOUR content on THEIR terms. Flash players at obscure websites is hardly the totally of terms YOUR AUDIENCE might come to you with or request from you.

First part of having a niche audience, giving them what they want …

With companies like Kunaki in play it is, simply, wrong, not to offer everything you do on disc of some sort.

How easy is it to get your stuff?

What do you have to lose?

You can add “Ask A Ninja” to your DVD queue at Netflix. Why can’t I get your show there?

“New Media” that acts like “Old Media” is missing the point.

What we bring to the game is so much more than cheap cameras and the quest for unlimited hosting for less than the cost of a latte.

More and more of what’s coming out these days looks like an attempt at “beating the studio system” than it is “changing media” as we originally started to do.

Just ask yourself this simple question … what do you really want to be doing? What is your dream here? If it’s a show on Fox or a movie on HBO, I’d say you got a better chance going the “traditional” route at this point.

If your goal is to take a small audience to places they’ve never been before and make a good profit doing it, are you on the right path for such?

We don’t act like we want our audience to act. That’s called hypocrisy.

How much “New Media” have you consumed this week? How much have you produced this week?

Ever notice that the more you eat this dogfood, the more successful you are? Rocketboom, TWiT, and Revision3 anyone?

Yes, our audience is following our lead – it’s just a bad one.

You can’t sell advertisers the same pack of lies they can. Admit it, you’ve been thinking this for years …

Yup, those advertisers pushing their 30 second spots designed for Oprah online aren’t even close to getting their money’s worth. Don’t worry, they might not be getting their money’s worth on Oprah either.

But, you don’t have the cache or the agency behind you to get those kinds of deals for your show – so stop thinking that’s your ticket.

New Media’s success won’t come from successfully lying to advertisers and audience members – it is the complete opposite.

Even if your basement, it’s still business. I’m still surprised how many have mastered Final Cut and purchased thousands of dollars in computer equipment but who haven’t done more than surf a few blogs (written by guys with day jobs) to figure out how they’re going to make money here.

It’s called “Show Business” or “Information Marketing Business” or “Training Business” or “[Insert Term Here] Business” for a reason.

What business are you in?

Are you in business at all?

Could that be why profit ain’t much?

Blogworld And New Media Expo Report

Update #1: As per request at the “Profitable Podcaster” breakfast Meetup we had a Blogworld and New Media Expo, we have launched a Profitable Podcasting Page at Facebook. Link – http://www.facebook.com/profitablepodcasting

Update #2: Just got off phone with Rick, he loved my ideas and I’ll certainly be (a bigger) part of this next year. I recommend you be part of it as well.

I write this at the Las Vegas Airport with really bad coffee but some very good (free wifi). I figured I’d dash out of my thoughts on the event before I get on the plane.

  • I’m coming back next year. Rick Calvert brought a ton of people together that I really need to see, shake hands with, hug, make deals with and more. It may not have been the complete list – but it was a heck of a lot more complete than any other option out there. I’ll be back. In what capacity? Keep reading.
  • “Missing Ontario” is silly. I heard from a few Podcasters that they “missed” the Ontario days. That’s somewhat as smart as missing the days of the 2400 baud modem (ask your parents). We need to continue to grow as an industry and you do that by having your industry expos in towns that host industry expos.
  • The companies who didn’t attend are doing far more damage than their Vegas bill could ever rack up. If we are going to become an “industry” we need to act like an “industry” – that means we show up to our events, buy booths, court new customers, appreciate the old ones, raise expectations and standards, etc. “Not knowing if it is worth it” is a weak response. Lead us with a strong one. Mad props to Leo Laporte committing to bring his entire staff to next year’s event. We will hold you to it. To the companies who hosted parties, we’ll get you the press you deserve to believing in this. I challenge Jim Louderback of Revision3 and even Adam Curry of Mevio to do the same. Wizzard – where were you? Microsoft, Apple, etc., wake up.
  • We need to expand the term “monetization.” I realized in the middle of day 2 that for some the term “monetization” means seeing the first elusive dollar for their efforts while for others it means breaking 7 and 8 digit barriers. When I shared news of a Podcast generating more than a thousand dollars a day (that was actually willing to speak it’s name and show proof), I saw half the room with an excited look in their eyes of what was possible while I saw others staring with a blank look that screamed “so, should I do those Adsense things from the Google?” Maybe next year we have a “Monetization” track and then a “Real Money” track? Thoughts?
  • We’re grownups – and we need to act like it. I want this to be constructive, but the closing keynote was insulting and damaging. The pride where by which the participants spewed constant and consistent profanities and potty level sex jokes made us look like a bunch of silly middle schoolers with a tiny bit of freedom but no understanding of how the real world works. There is more to new media than being able to swear. I have no problem with profanity and abhor censorship but when you go to NC-17 levels of “humor” just because you can, it doesn’t convince anyone to take you seriously. Even Vegas knows how to label adult stuff. Nuff said, and I’m sure I’ll get some “sh*t” for this one.
  • We need focus. This is an extension of the thoughts above but goes in the other direction as well. Like we need to expand the concept of monetization to include “real” versus “beer” money we need to move from the fan and hobbyist club mentality to working together to build this industry. I understand how complicated it is to even hope that thousands of people attending your even will do anything, but I think we can kick it up a notch here. This is a much a comment for the vendors, presenters and attendees as it is a comment for the event as a whole.
  • My offer to Rick. Rick, we have the makings here of something pretty fabulous and special. I’d love to help next year in any way I can. I’ve got a an idea a bit too complex to share in this blog (plus the flight is about to board) that I’d like to run that by you as well. I think I “get” what you’re trying to do here and my concept will (I think at least) further your solid agenda. I hope we can chat once you catch up on your sleep.

I would really appreciate your thoughts on this one. Please leave them below.